CLMR


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bag-of-dirt:

French Resistance fighters line the streets of Chartres to listen to the speech of leader of the Free French Forces, General Charles de Gaulle, proclaiming the city’s complete liberation from German-occupation. Chartres was liberated on 18 August 1944 by the U.S. Army’s 5th Infantry and 7th Armored Divisions, belonging to XX Corps of the 3rd U.S. Army (United States Army Central). Chartres, Eure-et-Loir, Region of Centre, France. 23 Agust 1944. Image taken by Robert Capa.

bag-of-dirt:

French Resistance fighters line the streets of Chartres to listen to the speech of leader of the Free French Forces, General Charles de Gaulle, proclaiming the city’s complete liberation from German-occupation. Chartres was liberated on 18 August 1944 by the U.S. Army’s 5th Infantry and 7th Armored Divisions, belonging to XX Corps of the 3rd U.S. Army (United States Army Central). Chartres, Eure-et-Loir, Region of Centre, France. 23 Agust 1944. Image taken by Robert Capa.

Jul 29th · 70 · © · tagged: ww2 french resistance
bag-of-dirt:

Ruth Lee, an American woman of Chinese ancestry who works as a hostess at a Chinese restaurant, displays the flag of the Republic of China while she sunbathes on the beach so that other beach-goers do not mistake her for Japanese in the days following the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor and Naval Air Station Kaneohe Bay and the U.S. declaration of war on the Empire of Japan. Miami, Florida, U.S.A. 15 December 1941.

bag-of-dirt:

Ruth Lee, an American woman of Chinese ancestry who works as a hostess at a Chinese restaurant, displays the flag of the Republic of China while she sunbathes on the beach so that other beach-goers do not mistake her for Japanese in the days following the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor and Naval Air Station Kaneohe Bay and the U.S. declaration of war on the Empire of Japan. Miami, Florida, U.S.A. 15 December 1941.

Jul 27th · 412 · © · tagged: ww2 chinese american racism
setnet:

zizzerzazzerzuzz:

Leningrad during the siege, May 1st, 1942. Ladies are awesome.

casual reminder that the first line of defence at the battle of stalingrad was a group of teenage girls with machine guns

setnet:

zizzerzazzerzuzz:

Leningrad during the siege, May 1st, 1942. Ladies are awesome.

casual reminder that the first line of defence at the battle of stalingrad was a group of teenage girls with machine guns

Jul 27th · 915 · © · tagged: ww2 women in war leningrad

greatestgeneration:

Servicemen at Fort Benning, Georgia show the proper set-up and components of a SCR-284 field radio. 24 July 1944.

U.S. Army Signal Corps photograph, Gift in Memory of Maurice T. White, from the collection of The National WWII Museum

Jul 25th · 111 · © · tagged: ww2

Victoria League of New Zealand Records, Members of the British West Indies Regiment in camp on the Albert-Amiens Road during the Battle of the Somme, 1916.
“National symbols, soldiers, and personalities were important in maintaining the enthusiasm of Britain’s dominions during the war. However, depictions of unfamiliar imperial soldiers, particularly from British imperial colonies such as India and the West Indies, were also powerful wartime symbols of the British Empire.
This photograph is another example of British official photographer Lt. Ernest Brooks’ more posed, formal photographs, of a group soldiers from the British West Indies Regiment, in camp on the Albert-Amiens Road, during the Somme Offensive of 1916. This image is notable as it reflects the manner in which imperial troops were presented in British propaganda. Images of British Imperial troops from both white settler dominions and imperial colonies such as India were numerous, as it was a strong British interest to present the strength, unity, size and diversity of its empire throughout the war, to reassure members of the empire, and to impress or intimidate neutral or enemy nations. However, the manner of depiction of peoples within the empire varied. Images of British soldiers interacting with troops from settler dominions such as New Zealand were common, and presented an image of the empire as a family of equals. This was important in maintaining dominion morale and enthusiasm for the war. Colonial troops, such as these British West Indian troops were rarely portrayed in the same inclusive manner. Instead, just as in this image, imperial troops were more commonly photographed separately, as their own distinct, yet important, component of the empire, as somewhat exotic imperial oddities. Despite this separation, it was still important to promote images of ‘imperial’ enthusiasm for the war, from regions such as the West Indies. These depictions of enthusiastic imperial involvement were not strictly fabrications, for instance the response from India alone garnered over 1,000,000 volunteers, while the West Indian Regiment fought in a number of campaigns, both in France, such as the Somme, and in sideshows in German colonies in Africa. It was therefore of great propaganda use for the British to portray this enthusiasm through images of enthusiastic, happy imperial troops, such as this image. These depictions helped the Britain’s colonies and dominions to conceptualise the war as a collective imperial struggle in which they had a vital role to play, instead of a strictly European war.”
--Imperial Legacies: Revealing the Victoria League’s First World War Images, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, NZ

Victoria League of New Zealand Records, Members of the British West Indies Regiment in camp on the Albert-Amiens Road during the Battle of the Somme, 1916.

National symbols, soldiers, and personalities were important in maintaining the enthusiasm of Britain’s dominions during the war. However, depictions of unfamiliar imperial soldiers, particularly from British imperial colonies such as India and the West Indies, were also powerful wartime symbols of the British Empire.

This photograph is another example of British official photographer Lt. Ernest Brooks’ more posed, formal photographs, of a group soldiers from the British West Indies Regiment, in camp on the Albert-Amiens Road, during the Somme Offensive of 1916. This image is notable as it reflects the manner in which imperial troops were presented in British propaganda. Images of British Imperial troops from both white settler dominions and imperial colonies such as India were numerous, as it was a strong British interest to present the strength, unity, size and diversity of its empire throughout the war, to reassure members of the empire, and to impress or intimidate neutral or enemy nations. However, the manner of depiction of peoples within the empire varied. Images of British soldiers interacting with troops from settler dominions such as New Zealand were common, and presented an image of the empire as a family of equals. This was important in maintaining dominion morale and enthusiasm for the war. Colonial troops, such as these British West Indian troops were rarely portrayed in the same inclusive manner. Instead, just as in this image, imperial troops were more commonly photographed separately, as their own distinct, yet important, component of the empire, as somewhat exotic imperial oddities. Despite this separation, it was still important to promote images of ‘imperial’ enthusiasm for the war, from regions such as the West Indies. These depictions of enthusiastic imperial involvement were not strictly fabrications, for instance the response from India alone garnered over 1,000,000 volunteers, while the West Indian Regiment fought in a number of campaigns, both in France, such as the Somme, and in sideshows in German colonies in Africa. It was therefore of great propaganda use for the British to portray this enthusiasm through images of enthusiastic, happy imperial troops, such as this image. These depictions helped the Britain’s colonies and dominions to conceptualise the war as a collective imperial struggle in which they had a vital role to play, instead of a strictly European war.”

--Imperial Legacies: Revealing the Victoria League’s First World War Images, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, NZ
Jul 24th · 11 · © · tagged: ww2
ww2inpictures:

African-American tank crews and their M5 Stuart light tanks wait for orders in Coburg, Germany - 25th of April 1945.

ww2inpictures:

African-American tank crews and their M5 Stuart light tanks wait for orders in Coburg, Germany - 25th of April 1945.

Jul 24th · 28 · © · tagged: ww2
indypendenthistory:

Members of the Women’s Army Corps pose at Camp Shanks, N.Y., before leaving on Feb. 2, 1945.
(via http://www.npr.org/blogs/pictureshow/2013/01/25/170177873/a-brief-history-of-women-in-combat)

indypendenthistory:

Members of the Women’s Army Corps pose at Camp Shanks, N.Y., before leaving on Feb. 2, 1945.

(via http://www.npr.org/blogs/pictureshow/2013/01/25/170177873/a-brief-history-of-women-in-combat)

Jul 24th · 31 · © · tagged: ww2 women in war WAC
indypendenthistory:

March 1945. “Tuskegee Airmen series. ‘Escape kits’ (cyanide) being distributed to fighter pilots at air base in Ramitelli, Italy.” Theodore G. Lumpkin Jr., seated, with (L-R): Joseph L. “Joe” Chineworth, Memphis, Class 44-E; Robert C. Robinson, Asheville, Class 44-G; Driskell B. Ponder, Chicago, 43-I; Robert W. Williams, Ottumwa, Iowa, 44-E. Gelatin silver print by Toni Frissell. 
(via Shorpy Historical Photo Archive :: Suicide Rations: 1945)

indypendenthistory:

March 1945. “Tuskegee Airmen series. ‘Escape kits’ (cyanide) being distributed to fighter pilots at air base in Ramitelli, Italy.” Theodore G. Lumpkin Jr., seated, with (L-R): Joseph L. “Joe” Chineworth, Memphis, Class 44-E; Robert C. Robinson, Asheville, Class 44-G; Driskell B. Ponder, Chicago, 43-I; Robert W. Williams, Ottumwa, Iowa, 44-E. Gelatin silver print by Toni Frissell. 

(via Shorpy Historical Photo Archive :: Suicide Rations: 1945)

Jul 24th · 16 · © · tagged: ww2 Tuskegee

Braver than any man: Revealed for the first time, the awe-inspiring courage of two British sisters who waged a one-family war on the Nazis - and were left with emotional scars that never healed 

Jul 24th · 177 · © · tagged: ww2 women in war SOE
lostsplendor:

Hazel Lee [1912-1944] 
Experienced women pilots, like Lee, were eager to join the WASP, and responded to interview requests by Cochran. Members of the WASP reported to Avenger Field, in wind swept Sweetwater, Texas for an arduous 6-month training program. Lee was accepted into the 4th class, 43 W 4.[2] Hazel Ying Lee was the first Chinese American woman to fly for the United States military.
Although flying under military command, the women pilots of the WASP were classified as civilians. They were paid through the civil service. No military benefits were offered. Even if killed in the line of duty, no military funerals were allowed. The WASPs were often assigned the least desirable missions, such as winter trips in open cockpit airplanes. Commanding officers were reluctant to give women any flying deliveries. It took an order from the head of the Air Transport Command to improve the situation.
Upon graduation, Lee was assigned to the third Ferrying Group at Romulus, Michigan. Their assignment was critical to the war effort; Deliver aircraft, pouring out of converted automobile factories, to points of embarkation, where they would then be shipped to the European and Pacific War fronts. In a letter to her sister, Lee described Romulus as “a 7-day workweek, with little time off.” When asked to describe Lee’s attitude, a fellow member of the WASP summed it up in Lee’s own words, “I’ll take and deliver anything.”
Described by her fellow pilots as “calm and fearless,” Lee had two forced landings. One landing took place in a Kansas wheat field. A farmer, pitchfork in hand, chased her around the plane while shouting to his neighbors that the Japanese had invaded Kansas. Alternately running and ducking under her wing, Lee finally stood her ground. She told the farmer who she was and demanded that he put the pitchfork down. He complied.
Lee was a favorite with just about all of her fellow pilots. She had a great sense of humor and a marvelous sense of mischief. Lee used her lipstick to inscribe Chinese characters on the tail of her plane and the planes of her fellow pilots. One lucky fellow who happened to be a bit on the chubby side, had his plane dubbed (unknown to him) “Fat Ass.”
Lee was in demand when a mission was RON (Remaining Overnight) In a big city or in a small country town, she could always find a Chinese restaurant, supervise the menu, and often cook the food herself. She was a great cook. Fellow WASP pilot Sylvia Dahmes Clayton observed that “Hazel provided me with an opportunity to learn about a different culture at a time when I did not know anything else. She expanded my world and my outlook on life.”
Lee and the others were the first women to pilot fighter aircraft for the United States military.
Image (via World War II Database)
Text [click for full article] (via Wikipedia)

lostsplendor:

Hazel Lee [1912-1944] 

Experienced women pilots, like Lee, were eager to join the WASP, and responded to interview requests by Cochran. Members of the WASP reported to Avenger Field, in wind swept Sweetwater, Texas for an arduous 6-month training program. Lee was accepted into the 4th class, 43 W 4.[2] Hazel Ying Lee was the first Chinese American woman to fly for the United States military.

Although flying under military command, the women pilots of the WASP were classified as civilians. They were paid through the civil service. No military benefits were offered. Even if killed in the line of duty, no military funerals were allowed. The WASPs were often assigned the least desirable missions, such as winter trips in open cockpit airplanes. Commanding officers were reluctant to give women any flying deliveries. It took an order from the head of the Air Transport Command to improve the situation.

Upon graduation, Lee was assigned to the third Ferrying Group at Romulus, Michigan. Their assignment was critical to the war effort; Deliver aircraft, pouring out of converted automobile factories, to points of embarkation, where they would then be shipped to the European and Pacific War fronts. In a letter to her sister, Lee described Romulus as “a 7-day workweek, with little time off.” When asked to describe Lee’s attitude, a fellow member of the WASP summed it up in Lee’s own words, “I’ll take and deliver anything.”

Described by her fellow pilots as “calm and fearless,” Lee had two forced landings. One landing took place in a Kansas wheat field. A farmer, pitchfork in hand, chased her around the plane while shouting to his neighbors that the Japanese had invaded Kansas. Alternately running and ducking under her wing, Lee finally stood her ground. She told the farmer who she was and demanded that he put the pitchfork down. He complied.

Lee was a favorite with just about all of her fellow pilots. She had a great sense of humor and a marvelous sense of mischief. Lee used her lipstick to inscribe Chinese characters on the tail of her plane and the planes of her fellow pilots. One lucky fellow who happened to be a bit on the chubby side, had his plane dubbed (unknown to him) “Fat Ass.”

Lee was in demand when a mission was RON (Remaining Overnight) In a big city or in a small country town, she could always find a Chinese restaurant, supervise the menu, and often cook the food herself. She was a great cook. Fellow WASP pilot Sylvia Dahmes Clayton observed that “Hazel provided me with an opportunity to learn about a different culture at a time when I did not know anything else. She expanded my world and my outlook on life.”

Lee and the others were the first women to pilot fighter aircraft for the United States military.

Image (via World War II Database)

Text [click for full article] (via Wikipedia)

Jul 24th · 5584 · © · tagged: hazel lee ww2 WASP women in war