CLMR


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ibangmyowndrum:

♛ HISTORY MEME ♛ [4/6] REVOLUTIONS: Warsaw Ghetto Uprising/em>

In 1940, German occupational authorities began to concentrate Poland’s population of over three million Jews into a number of extremely crowded ghettos located in large Polish cities. The largest of these, the Warsaw Ghetto, concentrated approximately 300,000–400,000 people into a densely packed, 3.3 km² central area of Warsaw. Thousands of Jews died due to rampant disease and starvation under SS-und-Polizeiführer Odilo Globocnik and SS-Standartenführer Ludwig Hahn, even before the mass deportations from the Ghetto to the Treblinka extermination camp began.

When the deportations first began, members of the Jewish resistance movement met and decided not to fight the SS directives, believing that the Jews were being sent to labour camps and not to their deaths. By the end of 1942, Ghetto inhabitants learned that the deportations were part of an extermination process. Many of the remaining Jews decided to revolt.

The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising (Yiddish: אױפֿשטאַנד אין װאַרשעװער געטאָ; Polish: powstanie w getcie warszawskim; German: Aufstand im Warschauer Ghetto) was the 1943 act of Jewish resistance that arose within the Warsaw Ghetto, and which opposed Nazi Germany’s final effort to transport the remaining Ghetto population to Treblinka extermination camp. The most significant portion of the rebellion took place from 19 April, and ended when the poorly armed and supplied resistance was crushed by the Germans, who officially finished their operation to liquidate the Ghetto on 16 May. It was the largest single revolt by Jews during World War II. [x]

theladybadass:

Department of Defense film, Nurses in the Army (circa 1940s, 1950s)

Aug 4th · 37 · © · tagged: Nurses
ifshewasconfrontedbyambiguities:

gedenkenbrauchtwissen:


Dear Mother and Father,
You have, by this time, received a letter mentioning that I am quartered in the concentration camp at Dachau. It is still undecided whether we will be permitted to describe the conditions here, but I’m writing this now to tell you a little, and will mail it later when we are told we can. 
It is difficult to know how to begin. By this time I have recovered from my first emotional shock and am able to write without seeming like a hysterical gibbering idiot. Yet, I know you will hesitate to believe me no matter how objective and focused I try to be. I even find myself trying to deny what I am looking at with my own eyes. Certainly, what I have seen in the past few days will affect my personality for the rest of my life. 

“It Is Difficult to Know How to Begin”: A U.S. Soldier Writes Home From Dachau.  Read full text here and view these photos here.

My great-grandfather was a Dachau survivor. He also fought at Verdun, in the Greater Poland Uprising and under Pilsudski at Lviv against the Bolsheviks. Out of all these experiences, Dachau was the one he couldn’t talk about without crying. Not even 60 years later.

ifshewasconfrontedbyambiguities:

gedenkenbrauchtwissen:

Dear Mother and Father,

You have, by this time, received a letter mentioning that I am quartered in the concentration camp at Dachau. It is still undecided whether we will be permitted to describe the conditions here, but I’m writing this now to tell you a little, and will mail it later when we are told we can. 

It is difficult to know how to begin. By this time I have recovered from my first emotional shock and am able to write without seeming like a hysterical gibbering idiot. Yet, I know you will hesitate to believe me no matter how objective and focused I try to be. I even find myself trying to deny what I am looking at with my own eyes. Certainly, what I have seen in the past few days will affect my personality for the rest of my life. 

“It Is Difficult to Know How to Begin”: A U.S. Soldier Writes Home From Dachau.  Read full text here and view these photos here.

My great-grandfather was a Dachau survivor. He also fought at Verdun, in the Greater Poland Uprising and under Pilsudski at Lviv against the Bolsheviks. Out of all these experiences, Dachau was the one he couldn’t talk about without crying. Not even 60 years later.

Aug 1st · 68 · © · tagged: POW ww2

operationbarbarossa:

Paratroopers of the 508th PIR, 82nd Airborne Division, adjust their parachutes prior to their jump behind enemy lines near Utah Beach - 5 June 1944

Jul 31st · 874 · © · tagged: ww2 82nd 508th PIR airborne
demons:

An RAF bomber crew being debriefed by the squadron intelligence officer on their return from a night raid over Germany, 1941/Cecil Beaton

demons:

An RAF bomber crew being debriefed by the squadron intelligence officer on their return from a night raid over Germany, 1941/Cecil Beaton

Jul 31st · 92 · © · tagged: ww2 raf
bag-of-dirt:

French Resistance fighters line the streets of Chartres to listen to the speech of leader of the Free French Forces, General Charles de Gaulle, proclaiming the city’s complete liberation from German-occupation. Chartres was liberated on 18 August 1944 by the U.S. Army’s 5th Infantry and 7th Armored Divisions, belonging to XX Corps of the 3rd U.S. Army (United States Army Central). Chartres, Eure-et-Loir, Region of Centre, France. 23 Agust 1944. Image taken by Robert Capa.

bag-of-dirt:

French Resistance fighters line the streets of Chartres to listen to the speech of leader of the Free French Forces, General Charles de Gaulle, proclaiming the city’s complete liberation from German-occupation. Chartres was liberated on 18 August 1944 by the U.S. Army’s 5th Infantry and 7th Armored Divisions, belonging to XX Corps of the 3rd U.S. Army (United States Army Central). Chartres, Eure-et-Loir, Region of Centre, France. 23 Agust 1944. Image taken by Robert Capa.

Jul 29th · 77 · © · tagged: ww2 french resistance
bag-of-dirt:

Ruth Lee, an American woman of Chinese ancestry who works as a hostess at a Chinese restaurant, displays the flag of the Republic of China while she sunbathes on the beach so that other beach-goers do not mistake her for Japanese in the days following the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor and Naval Air Station Kaneohe Bay and the U.S. declaration of war on the Empire of Japan. Miami, Florida, U.S.A. 15 December 1941.

bag-of-dirt:

Ruth Lee, an American woman of Chinese ancestry who works as a hostess at a Chinese restaurant, displays the flag of the Republic of China while she sunbathes on the beach so that other beach-goers do not mistake her for Japanese in the days following the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor and Naval Air Station Kaneohe Bay and the U.S. declaration of war on the Empire of Japan. Miami, Florida, U.S.A. 15 December 1941.

Jul 27th · 1055 · © · tagged: ww2 chinese american racism
setnet:

zizzerzazzerzuzz:

Leningrad during the siege, May 1st, 1942. Ladies are awesome.

casual reminder that the first line of defence at the battle of stalingrad was a group of teenage girls with machine guns

setnet:

zizzerzazzerzuzz:

Leningrad during the siege, May 1st, 1942. Ladies are awesome.

casual reminder that the first line of defence at the battle of stalingrad was a group of teenage girls with machine guns

Jul 27th · 916 · © · tagged: ww2 women in war leningrad

greatestgeneration:

Servicemen at Fort Benning, Georgia show the proper set-up and components of a SCR-284 field radio. 24 July 1944.

U.S. Army Signal Corps photograph, Gift in Memory of Maurice T. White, from the collection of The National WWII Museum

Jul 25th · 115 · © · tagged: ww2

Victoria League of New Zealand Records, Members of the British West Indies Regiment in camp on the Albert-Amiens Road during the Battle of the Somme, 1916.
“National symbols, soldiers, and personalities were important in maintaining the enthusiasm of Britain’s dominions during the war. However, depictions of unfamiliar imperial soldiers, particularly from British imperial colonies such as India and the West Indies, were also powerful wartime symbols of the British Empire.
This photograph is another example of British official photographer Lt. Ernest Brooks’ more posed, formal photographs, of a group soldiers from the British West Indies Regiment, in camp on the Albert-Amiens Road, during the Somme Offensive of 1916. This image is notable as it reflects the manner in which imperial troops were presented in British propaganda. Images of British Imperial troops from both white settler dominions and imperial colonies such as India were numerous, as it was a strong British interest to present the strength, unity, size and diversity of its empire throughout the war, to reassure members of the empire, and to impress or intimidate neutral or enemy nations. However, the manner of depiction of peoples within the empire varied. Images of British soldiers interacting with troops from settler dominions such as New Zealand were common, and presented an image of the empire as a family of equals. This was important in maintaining dominion morale and enthusiasm for the war. Colonial troops, such as these British West Indian troops were rarely portrayed in the same inclusive manner. Instead, just as in this image, imperial troops were more commonly photographed separately, as their own distinct, yet important, component of the empire, as somewhat exotic imperial oddities. Despite this separation, it was still important to promote images of ‘imperial’ enthusiasm for the war, from regions such as the West Indies. These depictions of enthusiastic imperial involvement were not strictly fabrications, for instance the response from India alone garnered over 1,000,000 volunteers, while the West Indian Regiment fought in a number of campaigns, both in France, such as the Somme, and in sideshows in German colonies in Africa. It was therefore of great propaganda use for the British to portray this enthusiasm through images of enthusiastic, happy imperial troops, such as this image. These depictions helped the Britain’s colonies and dominions to conceptualise the war as a collective imperial struggle in which they had a vital role to play, instead of a strictly European war.”
--Imperial Legacies: Revealing the Victoria League’s First World War Images, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, NZ

Victoria League of New Zealand Records, Members of the British West Indies Regiment in camp on the Albert-Amiens Road during the Battle of the Somme, 1916.

National symbols, soldiers, and personalities were important in maintaining the enthusiasm of Britain’s dominions during the war. However, depictions of unfamiliar imperial soldiers, particularly from British imperial colonies such as India and the West Indies, were also powerful wartime symbols of the British Empire.

This photograph is another example of British official photographer Lt. Ernest Brooks’ more posed, formal photographs, of a group soldiers from the British West Indies Regiment, in camp on the Albert-Amiens Road, during the Somme Offensive of 1916. This image is notable as it reflects the manner in which imperial troops were presented in British propaganda. Images of British Imperial troops from both white settler dominions and imperial colonies such as India were numerous, as it was a strong British interest to present the strength, unity, size and diversity of its empire throughout the war, to reassure members of the empire, and to impress or intimidate neutral or enemy nations. However, the manner of depiction of peoples within the empire varied. Images of British soldiers interacting with troops from settler dominions such as New Zealand were common, and presented an image of the empire as a family of equals. This was important in maintaining dominion morale and enthusiasm for the war. Colonial troops, such as these British West Indian troops were rarely portrayed in the same inclusive manner. Instead, just as in this image, imperial troops were more commonly photographed separately, as their own distinct, yet important, component of the empire, as somewhat exotic imperial oddities. Despite this separation, it was still important to promote images of ‘imperial’ enthusiasm for the war, from regions such as the West Indies. These depictions of enthusiastic imperial involvement were not strictly fabrications, for instance the response from India alone garnered over 1,000,000 volunteers, while the West Indian Regiment fought in a number of campaigns, both in France, such as the Somme, and in sideshows in German colonies in Africa. It was therefore of great propaganda use for the British to portray this enthusiasm through images of enthusiastic, happy imperial troops, such as this image. These depictions helped the Britain’s colonies and dominions to conceptualise the war as a collective imperial struggle in which they had a vital role to play, instead of a strictly European war.”

--Imperial Legacies: Revealing the Victoria League’s First World War Images, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, NZ
Jul 24th · 12 · © · tagged: ww2